maple leaf Conflict Resolution Workshop

Introduction

Conflict Resolution

Monitoring Behavior

Practice/Observe Conflicts

WHAT TO WATCH OUT FOR...



CONFLICT RESOLUTION

What is Conflict Resolution?

Conflict Resolution is a problem-solving approach to conflict. A "mediator" walks the complainants through a discussion of the conflict to help them solve their differences. There is a standard procedure that is taught when students are not in conflict so when they end up in one, they know the procedures.
Objectives of the workshop:
  1. To introduce teachers to a Conflict Resolution model.
  2. To allow teachers to observe it in action.
  3. To encourage teachers to "buy into" the proces.
  4. To provide time for practice.
  5. To see how Conflict Resolution can be used school-wide
Three Basic Models:

There are three basic conflict resolution models which can be used successfully in isolation, or they can be combined to create a model specific to a school:

1. In-class Model

A self-contained classroom where conflict resolution strategies are used. They are not used throughout the school because the school has not "bought" into it.

2. School-wide Model

The complete school addresses conflicts via conflict resolution strategies. Teachers in halls/etc. can approach any student conflict and will be able to interact using conflict resolution strategies because all students know how the system operates. Parents are often involved as well.

3. Community-wide Model

Students are taught concepts such as due process, the rights and responsibilities of individuals, how problems are resolved in courts, etc. Parents are highly involved, as are other community members.

Which model to use depends upon local needs. If most of the staff is in agreement but the community is not, then it is wise to start with a school-wide model. If the staff is not supportive, then start with the in-class model.

Three Basic Conflict Styles:

  1. Avoidance
  2. Confrontation
  3. Problem-solving

Active Listeners:

  1. Listen politely
  2. Ask questions for clarification
  3. Repeat what was said in your own words
  4. Summarize
  5. Acknowledge speakers point of view, feelings, etc.

Problem-Solving:

  1. Choose an appropriate time and place
  2. Identify the problem
  3. Brainstorm solutions
  4. Agree on a solution
  5. Avoid compromise or win/lose situations
  6. Always try for win/win situations
  7. Respect the rights and values of others
  8. Check back later to ensure the solution is working
Compromise and win/lose situations almost always produce dissatisfaction in everyone.

Practicing Conflict Resolution Strategies

As with teaching anything, students and teachers must be taught:

CONFLICT RESOLUTION

STEP #1:
Person #1: TELL YOUR SIDE of the story

Person #2: LISTEN ACTIVELY

STEP #2: REPEAT STEP #1 with roles reversed

STEP #3: Mediator CLARIFIES the CONFLICT

STEP #4: Everyone expresses FEELINGS (take turns)

STEP #5: How can we SOLVE this problem?

STEP #6: Select a WIN/WIN solution

STEP #7: Agree on FOLLOW-UP

STEP #8: Principal does CLOSURE



Life-Space Interview

{or how to use a crisis as a learning tool}

Conflict Resolution
STEPS 1&2
What is the
instigating
situation
Don't find fault, guilt, humiliate,
or moralize
Starting a timeline of events
       |
STEPS 1&2
Get the
student's
perception of
the problem
As the mediator - what your
perception is, at this time, doesn't
matter
Get sequence of events = getting
details for the timeline
       |
STEP 3
Clarify distortions
about what really
happened
Go back to the timeline for
clarification
Teaching cause & effect
       |
STEP 4
Talk about how
everyone felt
An important step as it validates
everyone's feelings
       |
STEPS 5&6
Plan for progress.
What should be
done now
Adding to the timeline
= what are we going to do?
       |
STEP 7
|__IF UNREALISTIC
---Clarify
Reality
Motivation
Options
Consequences
Next phase of the timeline
 
|__IF REALISTIC
---Implement
Follow through
Evaluate
The timeline is continued
       |
STEP 8
CLOSURE


Benefits of a Life-Space Interview

Combined with a

Conflict Resolution Approach:



MONITORING BEHAVIOR

Any policy that is implemented needs to be monitored. Monitoring will take many forms:

1. Monitoring student behavior

A sample monitoring form is on the next page. It assumes that many of the strategies will have been used to both address the problem and to find a positive solution. These notes are kept by the teacher. If the principal, or parents are involved, they also get copies. This way everyone involved is aware of what is going on. This type of system is useful because over time a specific student's file can be pulled and patterns can be looked for. If patterns are found, then pro-active strategies can be developed to help that student learn what "triggers" him.
2. Monitoring information going home
Some information does not have to go home, others must. Often this is student and/or situational dependent.
3. Monitoring the overall success of the policy
In order to see if what is being implemented works, there needs to be a monitoring component. This is often built into the Action Plans.
4. Monitoring changes in teacher/student/administrator/etc. behaviors
Staff meetings are great places to have a "social" component where problems with the system are discussed and alterations suggested.


NAME:
Date:
This student was:





NAME:
Date:
This student was:





Signed:


Signed:


MEETING:
Students(s) Teacher Principal
Parent(s) Other(s):



MEETING:
Students(s) Teacher Principal
Parent(s) Other(s):



ACTION PLAN

What each person involved is:
GOING TO DO:



INDICATORS OF SUCCESS



BY WHEN:

OTHER?

CLOSURE:
ACTION PLAN

What each person involved is:
GOING TO DO:



INDICATORS OF SUCCESS



BY WHEN:

OTHER?

CLOSURE:

Personal Growth

Student:   Date:
Student's Signature:
Parent's Signature:


circle of courage

COMMENTS:

what to watch out for...



Scenarios....

STUDENT - TO - STUDENT:

1. School Bus Incident

In the morning, the bus driver brings in two students (to classroom teacher). Says they were fighting on the bus. Didn't see what started it. Concerned about the violent verbal and physical behavior of Sally/Sam.
Denise/Dwayne:
{cocky...mouthy towards Sally/Sam...when S says something, D would respond in a "smart-ass" way}
Sally/Sam:
{extremely distraught...refuses to let D person talk...obviously mad at what happened...}
S claims:
1. S claims D pulled a knife and jabbed it several times at S.
2. S claims it's a real knife.
3. S threatens to tell mother.

D claims:
1. It's not a real knife, but a toy one {can't produce it as evidence}
2. Doesn't care if S tells the "whole world"

Additional information:

Sally/Sam is usually a student who avoids confrontations. Sally/Sam observed mother being stabbed with a knife and she had to be rushed to the hospital....
2. Fighting on Playground
Three students, from the same class, get sent to their teacher because they were in a fist fight on the play ground....
1. ALL three students have a different version of what happened.
2. It's a few minutes before 1:00 and as the teacher, you have to do some xeroxing before class {you don't have time to do both.}

3. Any other student - to - student scenario????

STUDENT - TO - ADULT:

1. Student wanting to go home before school is out

A student (Shirley age 16) says she has a headache and wants to skip the last two classes of the day. As you {a teacher or support worker} come into the room, a teacher, or support worker, is already arguing with Shirley. Shirley says she wants to go home, the teacher/support worker is saying she can't. There are at the stage of the arugment where the teacher/support worker is going to send Shirley to the office. You are 99% certain Shirley does not have a headache and is 'just trying to skip school.'

1. What is your responsibility/role in this situation?

2. How can the teacher/support worker who is arguing with Shirley "get out of the situation" they are in?

3. How can a Conflict Resolution strategy help?

4. Solve this conflict in a positive way.....

2. A student tells you to "F... Off!"

A 14 year old student, Tommy, is rough-housing in the hallway. He's pushing another student around. You ask them to stop, the other boy does but Tommy starts to get mouthy. You politely, and firmly, go over the school's expectations re: hallway behavior and point out Tommy's behavior was unacceptable. Tommy begins to argue with you and tells you to "F...Off."
1. Tommy is not "your student".
2. You're in a hurry to get to your class, which will start in about a minute.
3. You don't want the hassle of dealing with Tommy.
4. What will you do?

3. Other scenarios?????

ADULT - TO - ADULT:

1. Arugment between two adults

A case conference is being held to discuss what should be done with Barry, a 15 year old student. He is constantly in trouble, skipping classes, not doing homework, being disruptive in class, and so on. Present at the case conference are: principal, Barry's teachers, counsellor, and a support staff member who interacts on a regular basis with Barry. Two of the adults are arguing about what to do with Barry. One person wants him suspended, the other says suspensions don't work. Their argument is getting heated.
1. Barry IS disruptive in the class, in the halls, and outside.
2. When Barry is away, the class is much 'quieter'.
3. What has been 'done for Barry' to date includes:

4. The teacher who wants Barry suspended has had enough. He/she feels the school has done everything for Barry and it's time to focus on the needs of other students. The other person in the argument disagrees.

5. This is a common argument 'type', between adults, one of philosophical differences.

2. Any other example????


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